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Can you explain why you do what you do? This can be an essential stage in establishing your art and helping you move through creative blocks and convey your story.

This week we also touch on ideas around money and Alice has been inspired by two “artist date” trips.

Apple podcast

Today’s discussion was promoted by a book and TED talk by Simon Sinek, both entitled ‘Find Your Why.’  Sinek’s main point is that when you know the purpose of what you are doing, it is so much easier to make the right decisions, achieve good results, and sell it to others.

As artists, we can explore this on several levels – why do I make my art? Why am I making this particular series of paintings? And, at the granular level, why am I making this one specific painting?

Our wide-ranging conversation spans the desire to create things, the need to be seen, the drive to communicate our internal experience, and whether what we are really seeking is love. (Deep stuff!) We also get into how you find your purpose. It isn’t something you can just come up with in 5  minutes. For most of us, it is a gradual process of discovery and it arises from the work we do. We also acknowledge that so much of this changes over time – even if we know our why at this moment, it may well change in future years.

What’s inspired us this week?

I just loved my visit to Kettles Yard House and Exhibition, the house of Jim Ede who had been a curator at the Tate Gallery in London during the 20s and 30s. He was a great supporter of artists and gathered a remarkable collection of artwork and small scuptures.

Jim and his wife Helen converted 3 cottages and displayed the art alongside natural objects with a belief that art should be enjoyed by everyone and held daily ‘open houses’. If you are ever in Cambridge this very special place continues to be free, true to Jim’s vision, (but you need a timed ticket) and is a must-visit. Very special. Also, you will want to go home, declutter and only keep what is personally inspiring, useful or simply beautiful!

Cider Screw and Miro at Kettles Yard House

Also Mentioned: Simon Sinek  TED talk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4ZoJKF_VuA

https://www.colourtutor.com/

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Are commissions an essential part of being artist? Or do they scare you a little?

Apple podcast

This week’s discussion was sparked by a question we received from a listener. AJ asked this question about commissions:

“I am an up and coming artist with a handful of commission requests. I would love to learn about the professional way to handle commissions. How do you and Alice do this? How much do your charge? What do you do about edits? Should the client pay upfront or give a deposit?”

artist commission easel

The question led us into an interesting debate about how formalised a commission process should be. Alice sets clear parameters and her process has worked very well for her, while Louise has found that any kind of commitment feels heavy. She is therefore taking a much more informal approach (including refusing commissions unless they feel just right). 

We discuss practicalities (pricing, process, deposits etc), share our successes (as well as those that didn’t go so well), and debate the pluses and minuses of allowing client input during the creative process. 

While there is no one-size-fits-all “professional” methodology, the most important thing is for each artist to determine an approach that works for him or her (and make the parameters very clear to the buyer in advance). 

This week we also share some exciting studio news, celebrate the success of a fellow artist, and (literally) get a little bit potty-mouthed (!)

Mentioned: Zandra Stratford’s show at https://afternynegallery.com  (Until Sept 21st 2019) Find Zandra on Instagram @zandrastratford

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Do you feel the need for a “good” result every time you paint? Or hope for a painting that looks good at every stage? This can bring an added stress to making art and limit your ability to experiment.

Apple podcast
Art Juice podcast episode 33 making good art every time - a basketball scoring a goal

In this episode we discuss what might be at the bottom of this, quite natural, desire to feel satisfied and how we can work this into our process. 

We can all struggle with letting go of the need for a “good” result every time we paint – a good result meaning a finished painting or at least once that always looks good at every stage.

We cannot plan future work because all we have is past knowledge and that is too small and restrictive for what we need. Instead we need to follow the nudges of intuition and take a leap of faith that this will be true. Personally this is what making art has taught (is teaching!) me most – how to let go, welcoming the mistakes – errors which become family history, jokes – discovering rather than searching. It’s just where we need to be….

But first Louise has been taking trips out sketching and filming it all for course. Alice has been away in Cantabria, with the usual frenzy of things before a trip. Alice’s Yorkshire workshop is now sold out (if you’d like to hear about more please sign up HERE and mark yourself as an artist so you get any extra event messages).

Cloud Rainbow
Have you ever seen a cloud rainbow like this? No filter or tweaking!

Also, one listener asks “Am I not going to move forward in my art if I keep using my phone?” and we have some ideas of the advantages and disadvantages of using your phone as a recorder and where it may be holding you back.

Mentioned: Kyle Cease podcast interview – creativity and taking that one step (Warning; curse words!)
https://podtail.com/en/podcast/you-made-it-weird-with-pete-holmes/kyle-cease/

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Settle down, you are in for a treat in this discussion of the artist as problem solver!

Apple podcast
Megan Woodard Johnson collage artist

Megan Woodard Johnson is a mixed media artist who layers vintage paper ephemera with paint, various drawing media and found objects to tell evocative stories within her work. She shares how she uses these as the basis of her work and why they are so important.

Alice talks with Megan about your growth as an artist rarely being linear, often it comes from twists and decisions you made along the way and it’s only looking back we understand how all these parts fit together to create new opportunities.

We spoke about building a creative practice alongside a family and adapting to whatever your current situation allows, how it can be difficult to find honest critique of your work and where new classes and experiences can invigorate you.

Megan has some practical tips for loading your car (!), teaching workshops and how these also inspires new ideas and how creative collaborations allow you to blossom.

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

In our first breakout week, Louise is in discussion with artist Jacqui Fehl . Influenced by music, lyrics, feelings, stories, other artists, and the materials themselves, Jacqui’s art is as varied and unpredictable as her ever changing hair – sometimes light, humorous and colourful , while at other times serious with a touch of dark.

Apple podcast
Art Juice podcast Episode 31

“If I had to describe my work, I would say that it is a blend of grunge, whimsy and outsider.”

Jacqui is working on the largest commission she’s ever done, for the pediatric wing of a large hospital. She’s excited and also a little nervous, but she has a clear vision of what she wants to create.

As we dive deeply into issues around creative process, scaling up your work and developing your personal voice this quote came in to play:

“It quite frequently happens that you’re just treading water for quite a long time. Nothing really dramatic seems to be happening. … And then suddenly everything seems to lock together in a different way. It’s like a crystallization point where you can’t detect any single element having changed. There’s a proverb that says that the fruit takes a long time to ripen, but it falls suddenly … And that seems to be the process.”

Brian Eno
Art Juice podcast episode 31 with Jacqui Fehl
‘She Couldn’t Remember The Last Time She Cleared Out Her Purse’ by Jacqui Fehl

Jacqui gives her response to  “How do you define success as an artist?” and shares how her ability to roll with the punches has grown, overcoming some stressful events to pull off a successful show and earn a large commission.

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Things haven’t gone to plan chez Alice and Louise this week. Alice’s much anticipated summer break was swamped by rain, meaning a lot of wet walks and NONE of the planned sketchbook days out. To compound the situation, she also lost internet which meant she couldn’t catch up on important work.

Apple podcast

Louise worked for months on an online course, only to be let down by Zoom, YouTube and Mailchimp all on the same evening. The result was less than pretty!

Given these mini-disasters, we discuss how we react when things go wrong. It’s easy to say ‘put things into perspective’ but do we need to feel that emotion first? And if so, is there a way to feel the emotion, but also keep things in perspective?

Art Juice Podcast spilt milk

Audience Question

We answer a question about art degrees. One listener is considering whether to go for an MA.  We acknowledge that being an artist is about learning and stretching yourself, but we wonder whether taking an advanced degree is a safe option that simply postpones the inevitable time when you have to do this for yourself anyway.

We would love to hear you views on this topic too, if you’ve taken an MA, what did you feel it gave you?

Mentioned:

Louise’s course – Find Your Joy
Two Dots – you really don’t want to waste your time on this (unless you are only human!)

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

This week we’re discussing gender and how it influences the way we work. The high-end art world continues to be dominated by men and yet attend any workshop and most of the artists there will be women. Are female artists victims of a sexist society? Or are we actually holding ourselves back?

Apple podcast

Amongst looking for a lost cat, Louise has been ‘involved’ with making new content for her course and impressed herself by feeling more organised (by necessity!)

Alice has been taking and collecting selected work from exhibitions – you can see three pieces at The Annual Exhibition Society of Women Artists Tuesday 24th to Sunday 29th September at the Mall Galleries. I have a limited number of tickets for the Private View – if you’d like me to post you one, please contact me.

Working as a Female Artist in a Man's World

Does being a woman artist affect how you feel, act or make decisions?

We discuss how our parents influenced our attitudes, how women’s tendency to care for others can hinder us, and how we might make our way confidently in a man’s world without resorting to mimicking our male colleagues. We also wonder why some men take up two seats on a plane instead of just one! 

Where men often feel fully qualified for a role, even without all the necessary attributes, this study shows women will hold back until we can tick all the boxes.

Damn! Should have scrolled further down the page… Look! By 40 women’s confidence grows to match men and post 60 is greater!!!!! There is hope 🙂

What’s inspired?

As she delivers and mails her own paintings, Louise is reminded of the joy of owning art as she receives one she has just purchased. Alice is making plans to see the upcoming Olafur Eliasson exhibition at Tate Modern which is on until January 2020 and has been uplifted by watching this documentary.

Mentioned:

Alice’s mum’s book (for a great summer read) is called ‘The Baby Box’ by Jane Hayward
Buy the hard copy direct:  https://janehayward.blog/book/
Or on Amazon HERE 

‘The War of Art’ by Steven Pressfield HERE
Art and Fear’ by David Bayles and Ted Orland HERE

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

We discuss our different approaches to summer – Louise doesn’t slow down in summer and in fact, her online course is about to start which means she is working even harder. Alice has children, which means her summers have always been a time for family. So how do we fit art in to that?!

Apple podcast
Art Juice podcast

Keeping creative through the summer

Even with the best will in the world, it’s almost impossible to work while caring for young children so I have always had to find ways of creating which could be squeezed into the gaps around family time. This has included other creative projects including home decor, gardening, cooking, and reading the art books that I usually don’t have time for.

We also discuss sketchbooks and the different ways we have both used them, including how we divide ideas up vs a scrapbook model and an idea for a sketchbook-in-a-day project if you like a deep dive! THIS is the simple sketchbook I mentioned and would recommend if you would like to have a go at this.

print sketchbook Alice Sheridan
Does thinking about it as a scrapbook make it less precious?

Oh, and also we started a hashtag for sharing how you are keeping in touch with your art practice over the summer!! Simply use #artjuicesummer over on Instagram

If you would like to join Louise for her “Find your Joy” FREE mini course which kicks off on 2nd August there is still time to join. 

Audience Question

Our audience question is about charity donations: The listener wrote:

“Had my fill this week! Would make an interesting podcast. The tactics they use to get free artwork. How to say no. How to not feel guilty. If I’m targeted then others artists must be too.”

We have a slight reframe on this one … rather than seeing it as a bad thing, we talk about how to approach these requests in a more positive manner.

Perhaps you can split the proceeds? Perhaps you can choose a charity you feel strongly about and donate to that. Maybe the charity has high net worth donors and this might be a good marketing opportunity? Perhaps, as Alice has, you can find a more creative way to raise money than just donating a piece … but we both agree that there is no need to feel guilty about saying no. The charity has to ask for donations – it’s what they do – but you do not have to make them, any more than a local business has to give a gift voucher if they don’t want to.

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

This week we’re talking about transitions – those times when our work moves into a new phase.

Apple podcast
Art Juice podcast

When do we need to activate change in our art?

Perhaps it comes upon us almost without us noticing – perhaps we make a conscious decision, but either way, change can be both exciting and unsettling.

Louise is preparing to start new work in a few weeks time, and feeling pulled in several directions which feel unrelated.

Alice has started new work that could be seen as re-visiting and earlier interest. We talk about letting ideas go, and giving them time to develop, how you can recognise transition moments. And when you should be on alert that perhaps some new transition is needed to fire up your creative life again.

If this is something you would like to explore, then join Louise for her “Find your Joy” FREE mini course which kicks off on 2nd August 

> Find out more and join here <

Audience Question

I’m impatient in terms of wanting success with my art. I am in the early stages (exhibited for first time last year and sold fairly well) In your own experience and knowing other artists how long did things take to start gaining momentum in terms of sales and can you see what this was linked to?

@helenlong.artist via Instagram

We share our experiences of growth and what made a difference – easier to tell looking back!

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

Both of us are recognising our own intuition – but note how it can takes time to become clear enough to act decisively….Louise: “Asking for what I want instead of accepting what is offered and/or being swayed by others’ views. SO huge for me and a win for intuition over thought.”
Alice: “visiting the Barbara Rae exhibition – showed me what direction I want to go in.”

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

This one is a biggie… What does it mean to find our voice as an artist? How do we discover what we want to create? Especially as that may change over time.

Apple podcast

This week

At opposite ends of the spectrum, Louise has been preparing her new course and accepting that she may not paint as much for the next few weeks. Alice has enjoyed delivering a painting to a new home and getting stuck in to her self-set painting challenge.

Finding your artist voice

Louise believes the answer lies in following what you love. To do that you need to learn to play, which is something many people struggle with. Alice wonders what happens when you enjoy the process, but not the end result? She believes you may need to let go of some ‘rules’ so that you can  discover your own questions; questions that will guide your art as you develop your process.

If this is something you would like to explore, then join Louise for her “Find your Joy” FREE mini course which kicks off on 2nd August 

> Find out more and join here <

Audience Question

Hi, not sure if you have covered this yet on your podcasts as I only discovered them recently and still playing catch up ! Is it a good idea to have many same sized canvases or panels when working ? I would like to invest in quite a few to build up a body of work to show to galleries and I always have a dilemma on what size. Do galleries want a body of work all of the same size ? This was a theory a gallery said to me a few years back, ‘ if you can produce 20 or thirty paintings like this then we can sell them!’

So, do we have any theories and experience on what size panels or canvases sell best in a gallery setting or to clients? Well, we have some ideas of how you could think about this, but it may not be what you expect…

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

This week we are both inspired by the power of re-juvenation! Louise by shorts bursts of one hour painting sessions, and Alice has been re-fuelling bottles and using paint like it’s free…. (I know, if only! but this may help you use it a little free-er)

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands of making it each week can be challenging. Your support is allowing us to hire some editing help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

There is so much to mixing colour… it is one of the pure joys of painting, but it can be a little overwhelming. We share some ideas about our own colour habits and ways you can re-invigorate your own colour mixing.

Apple podcast

This week

Louise has found someone to help with the technical aspects of her online course, and is now working on a marketing plan. Alice has been fuelled by discovering where her mystery buyer came from and the power of follow-up.

How do you choose colour for your palette?

This week’s main topic was inspired by a question from Janes_artscapes on Instagram. She asks:

“I was hoping you could talk about colour mixing as opposed to buying already mixed colours. I want to invest in new paint, I’d just like to hear your opinion on different paints & colour mixing”

Jane

Find Jane’s work here: www.instagram.com/Janes_artscapes

This question led us into a discussion of colour and the way we use it in our work. For both of us, it is quite an important focus, but our preferred palettes are quite different. We discuss the emotional resonance of certain colours; the power of surprising ourselves with something different; the freedom that can come (paradoxically) with a limited palette; and mixing colours versus using them straight from the tube. We also discuss the relativity of colour, and Alice shares her approach of choosing one hero colour for each painting.

In the end, colour is an incredibly personal thing, and each artist approaches it in a different way. Some artists study colour theory, some spend hours mixing in a sketchbook, and some choose colours totally intuitively. And this is perhaps the most important point to come out of our discussion – we both believe that your use of colour should be guided not be rules or by what you think other artists would do, but by your own preferences and your goals for your work.

Would love to know your colour habits and any tips you have to use different colours – or what favourites you simply couldn’t do without! Let us know in the comments below….

Audience Question

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

Alice has been painting and is experimenting with a different way of working on canvas. Louise was energized by a blustery, cold, grey walk on Sandside beach in Cumbria.

Mentioned: 
Alice’s painting tutorial as guest artist for the True Colours membership is now available!

This includes filmed lessons guiding you through the making of two paintings, discussing colour choices, including collage and how to allow the painting to lead your intuitive decisions. You can join just for a month, or for longer if you’d like new monthly painting projects.

> Find out more and join here <

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands making it each week can be challenging. Your support would enable us to hire some help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Sharing our creative process is a highly effective way to connect with potential collectors. In fact, in today’s world it is essential, but it can feel vulnerable. Today we share our experiences and tips for exposing your art…

This week Louise has been organizing her files and ideas for marketing and enjoying how much better it feels. After a dead day lost to technology on Friday AND Monday, Alice had a purchase request “out of the blue” which leads us to discuss how to tell the difference between genuine enquiries and scams.

Apple podcast

Louise has been organizing her files and ideas for marketing and enjoying how much better it feels. After a dead day lost to technology on Friday AND Monday Alice had a purchase request “out of the blue” which leads us to discuss how to tell the difference between genuine enquiries and scams.

Audience Question

As artists we have unprecedented opportunities to market ourselves and our work. We no longer have to rely on galleries or agents – the internet allows us to connect directly with potential buyers. Sharing our creative process is a highly effective way to do this, and video can be a wonderful way to satisfy people’s interest. 

This week, we discuss different ways to get started with video, including how to create a video without appearing in it, how you can use Facebook “lives,” and why Instagram stories might be a good way to get started.

We also acknowledge the vulnerability that comes with sharing our creative practice and get the giggles about some of the not-so-nice comments we have received. But we both agree that the benefits far outweigh the (extremely rare) mean remarks. If we want people to see our art, we have to let them see us.

share your art online podcast

Audience Question

“I often feel demoralised when I spend time looking at posts of other artists on instagram. (I am otherwise pretty confident about my art and my abilities as an artist) have you personally ever felt this and if so how have you overcome it? I know social media is hugely important in terms of promoting my art.” 

Helen Long

Find Helen’s work here: www.instagram.com/helenlong.artist

If you have a question you’d like us to discuss, click here to send it to us

This week’s inspirations are all about taking time out for ourselves, Louise is learning about curing pain using brain plasticity with the Curable app .

Alice has enjoyed a day to review what has changed within her art and business with her coach. When we have a tendency to race ahead, pressing pause like this is a great way to ensure you are on track or brainstorm some ideas for what you could do differently. 

Mentioned: 
Louise’s videos on Facebook
Lisa Bean video course
Alice blooper reel

If you are enjoying the podcast this is an easy and inexpensive way to help support it and ensure it continues. The demands making it each week can be challenging. Your support would enable us to hire some help. If you’d like to help out with a one-time or a monthly donation, you can “buy us a coffee” us at Ko-fi.com/artjuice

Contribute to the podcast here:

Follow Alice on Instagram @alicesheridanstudio
or Louise @louisefletcher_art

Credits
“Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License